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What should be the criteria for determining which techniques are a core component of a vitalistic chiropractic curriculum?
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TOPIC: What should be the criteria for determining which techniques are a core component of a vitalistic chiropractic curriculum?

Re: What should be the criteria for determining which techniques are a core component of a vitalistic chiropractic curriculum? 5 years, 4 months ago #34

  • Stuart
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I think that the criteria for determining which techniques is best answered by being solid in our analysis. As a profession, we have explored numerous different ways of analyzing the spine for subluxation. Some are great and some are pure bunk. We need to know which falls into which category and how the great one's correlate with one another. Wit the explosion of neurological research and imaging procedures in the past decade, we also need to fund research to determine more effective ways to detect VS's. Once we are solid on our analysis, the techniques become easy to determine. They either work or they don't based upon our analysis.

Re: What should be the criteria for determining which techniques are a core component of a vitalistic chiropractic curriculum? 4 years, 5 months ago #38

  • blessedtoes
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jboyajian:
I think who and which ones are important.

It is widely acknowledged that a "problematic percentage" of instructors teach because they were disappointed in some way with practice - and I am not judging these faculty as bad or wrong. It is an incredibly rare person who can weather an unsuccessful career and return to teach without passing cynicism and negativity onto the students. They may even be great chiropracTORs and lousy at business, but as years go by without adjusting dozens of people daily adjusting skills will devolve as well.

Do we want anyone in this mindset teaching our students?

I am not sure why the colleges are in such financial trouble, and as a 8-year doc assuaged with student loan debt it irritates me to hear this. That being said we need creative ideas for motivating active TORs to teach in our schools. This is a tricky proposal everywhere, especially with the more remote schools.

Techniques must be based on 1) the proven efficacy of the system via case studies, research, & of active docs practicing it and 2) congruence with the idea of hands-on adjusting. I don't mean this to exclude methods like activator, necessarily, but certainly to exclude the more "energy work" types of techniques where contact is never made between chiropractor and client. These are reiki, not chiropractic.

Another focus must be to restore technique-teaching over region-teaching. When students learn 8 ways to adjust the cervical spine but not why these different techniques evolved and why they adjust differently, the student has no understanding of the system, of the methodology, which is no different than being a chiropractor in practice without having been taught the Big Idea to inform your treatment choices. I meet many recent grads from these programs who feel lost in regards to technique and why there are different ways to adjust any area in the first place - some don't even realize there is a rationale to CBP or Thompson or Gonstead. I guess they assume that doc with the fancy name was bored one day so came up with something new, or wanted to make a buck....

This also brings me back to who is teaching. As someone who practices one technique exclusively, I wouldn't have the foggiest idea how to teach a student how to do SOT or activator, etc. I can teach the Hell out of my technique, though! Can an instructor who is so diversified (no pun intended) really offer a quality education on 12 different techniques' history, protocols or methodology?!

Re: What should be the criteria for determining which techniques are a core component of a vitalistic chiropractic curriculum? 4 years, 5 months ago #39

  • stullius
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Great input and very astute. We are currently working to address these issues that are obviously affecting the quality of chiropractic education and subsequently the product we deliver as chiropractors.

Re: What should be the criteria for determining which techniques are a core component of a vitalistic chiropractic curriculum? 4 years, 5 months ago #40

  • blessedtoes
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Well great. Who is "we" and how can those of us in the field help? I'm bored with sending communications to associations and not hearing back... I don't live near any of the schools....

Re: What should be the criteria for determining which techniques are a core component of a vitalistic chiropractic curriculum? 4 years, 5 months ago #42

  • stullius
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MCQI is working closely with the Sustainability Committee, FVS and IFCO to bring about major reform of the chiropractic educational system. Revealing the exact nature of those efforts cannot be disclosed in a public forum because those that have lead us to where we are will do whatever they can to further their plan which does not include us.

My first suggestion is to take this survey and forward to students and recent graduates.

My second suggestion is to join the IFCO is you are not already a member and contact leadership to get more involved.

My third suggestion is to become involved in your state affairs and work towards becoming a board member or working with others to have them appointed.
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